Salem Baptist Church

Salem Baptist Church

Image Credit:
Salem Baptist Church, c. 1950, Digital Collection, University of Illinois Library, Resource #pmh4002, Urbana, IL

500 E. Park Street, Champaign, IL

Located at 500 E. Park Street in Champaign, Salem Baptist Church was initially established in 1867, the same year the University of Illinois was established, as Second Baptist Church at 406 E. Park ("the Old Coffee Place"). In 1874, the original church was destroyed by arson. After occupying locations at Swannell Drug Store at Main and Hickory, and on East Clark Street, the church bought the land at its current location in 1901 and began construction in 1908. It was renamed as Salem Baptist Church in 1911. 📍

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SOURCES:

“Church Dedication,” Champaign County Gazette, October 11, 1871, pg. 4

Champaign County Gazette, May 20, 1874

Decade:

1860-1869

Location(s):

  • Champaign, Illinois

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