Sergeant Allen A. Rivers, Sr.

Sergeant Allen A. Rivers, Sr.

Image Credit:
Above: Sergeant Allen A. Rivers, Sr., c. 1950s, Courtesy of Eunice J. Rivers, Champaign, IL │ Below: Champaign Police Department Officers, 1948, Champaign County Archives, Urbana Free Library, Urbana, IL

Allen A. Rivers, Sr. was hired as the first and, at the time, only African American in the Champaign Police Department on August 1, 1935. He worked for 33 years as a policeman rising from a “beat cop” to a motorcycle cop, and then to Sergeant before retiring. He was known as never having to fire his gun in pursuit of a criminal or during an arrest.

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A black and white photograph of the Champaign Police Department officers. More than 30 people appear in uniform in the photo but only one, Allen Rivers Sr., is African American.He was a member of the Elks, the ONO, the Urban League, the NAACP. He was a 33 1/3 Degree Mason and served as Worshipful Grand Master of the Long Star Lodge of the Prince Hall. He served as an honorary board member of the Champaign Park District and served as trustee for Bethel AME Church. Born on December 7, 1902, in Alexander County in southern Illinois, he came to Champaign in 1919 at the age of 17 and lived with his two aunts, sisters Callie and Pearl Marshall, who were hairdressers. In 1923, he married Clyda Mae Simpson, whose family had migrated from Kentucky. They had five children. After the death of Clyda Mae, he married Ellen Treadwell in 1952. Two of his sons went into law enforcement: Allen A, Rivers, Jr., a Military Policeman during the Korean War who later joined the University of Illinois Police Department; and Richard Rivers who like his brother became a Military Policeman. Richard was assigned special duty assignments until retiring. Allen Rivers died on November 12, 1989. A funeral was held at Bethel AME Church, and he was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery.

The Champaign Police Department did not hire a second African American policeman until around 1950, when it hired Franklin Sayles.

 

Decade:

1930-1939

People:

  • Allen A. Rivers

Location(s):

  • Champaign, Illinois

Additional Champaign Trail Sites

Social and Religious Life

Emancipation Day Celebrations

President Abraham Lincoln issued his Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862. For many years afterward, in or around September, African Americans would congregate at parks and other community spaces for Emancipation Day celebrations. These celebrations were held in Champaign, Homer, Tolono, Sidney, and other parts of Champaign County. Celebrations often included food, music, and dancing.

Military

William F. Earnest American Legion Post 559

African Americans from Champaign County fought bravely, and died, in World War I. Those who served did so with courage, honor, and distinction. Many of those who returned home found community and services at the William F. Earnest American Legion Post 559. Originally located at Fifth and Hill Streets, the Post is now located at 704 N. Hickory in Champaign. It was chartered in 1932 by African American World War I veterans and named for a fallen comrade who was a University of Illinois student-athlete from Homer, Illinois. Earnest served as a sergeant in the all-Black 370th Infantry Regiment from Illinois. One of the columns at Memorial Stadium also bears his name. The founding members of Post 559 were Clifford Caldwell, Robert H. Earnest (brother of William F. Earnest), Dr. L.P. Diffay, Dr. Henry Ellis, Alvin Foxwell, Raymond Hines, Thomas Macklin, Cecil D. Nelson, and George Ray. 📍

Education

Lawhead School

Harriet J. Lawhead School, built in 1907, was a small, four-room building. During its early years, it served German and Italian immigrants in the neighborhood. As African Americans moved into the area, the school was integrated for a period of time, but by the 1940s it was attended only by Black students. White children who lived in the area were sent to Columbia School. During World War II, two rooms in the basement of the school were used as a Servicemen’s Club, organized by community members for African American soldiers who were not welcomed in the USO at Chanute Field. The school was closed in 1952, prior to the opening of the new Booker T. Washington School and razed in 1990. It is now a parking lot.

Community

Social and Religious Life

St. Luke Christian Methodist Episcopal (C.M.E.) Church

Located at 809 N. Fifth Street in Champaign, St. Luke C.M.E. Church was established in 1901, making it the third-oldest historically African American congregation in Champaign County. Originally located on Eads Street in Urbana and called St. Luke Tabernacle Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, it was renamed in 1954 to Christian Methodist Episcopal. The church moved to its current location in 1914. 📍

Community

Social and Religious Life

Salem Baptist Church

Located at 500 E. Park Street in Champaign, Salem Baptist Church was initially established in 1867, the same year the University of Illinois was established, as Second Baptist Church at 406 E. Park ("the Old Coffee Place"). In 1874, the original church was destroyed by arson. After occupying locations at Swannell Drug Store at Main and Hickory, and on East Clark Street, the church bought the land at its current location in 1901 and began construction in 1908. It was renamed as Salem Baptist Church in 1911. 📍

Community

Carver Park

In 1951, African American civic leader Charles Phillips saw a need for quality single-family housing in the Black Community. So, he put together a “grass roots” coalition of friends and acquaintances to buy ten acres of farmland and hired developer Ozier-Weller Homes. Each family put up $350.00 to develop the 70-home subdivision named after African American scientist and inventor George Washington Carver. It was Champaign-Urbana’s first subdivision financed and built by African Americans. 📍